Inspiring Environmental Stewards

The Green Earth Book Award

The Green Earth Book Award is the nation’s first environmental stewardship book award for children and young adult books. Over 80 winning and honor books have been honored since 2005. The award continues to garner attention from the literary world as an esteemed award, bringing recognition to authors, but more importantly, providing the award-winning books to children.

Each year, an expert jury selects books that best convey the message of environmental stewardship in these categories:

    • Picture Book:  books for young readers in which the visual and verbal narratives tell the story
    • Children’s Fiction: novels for young readers up to age 12
    • Young Adult Fiction: books for readers from age 13 to 21
    • Children’s Nonfiction: nonfiction books for readers from infancy to age 12
    • Young Adult Nonfiction: nonfiction books for readers from 12 to age 21


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Click here to download a list of Green Earth Book Award Winners .

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Read Green Festival

The Green Earth Book Award Ceremony and Green Tie Reception is held in Washington, DC each year.  The festivities are a culmination of 3-days of eco-author visits and book donations to local area schools — all in honor of the new Green Earth Book Award winners and their efforts to bring the message of environmental stewardship to children and young adults, our next generation of environmental stewards.  The 2016 ceremony was once again be emceed by NBC 4 News Anchor Wendy Rieger.

If you are interested in becoming a sponsor for 2017, please contact:

Jenny Schmidt jschmidt@NatGen.org

2016 Winner – Picture Book

The Stranded Whale, written by Jane Yolen and illustrated by Melanie Cataldo (Candlewick Press)

A tale of a child’s effort to rescue a beached whale evokes a fierce love of wildlife and a universal sense of loss. Sally and her brothers are walking home from school along the dunes in their Maine town when they come upon an   enormous whale stranded on the beach. They recruit  people to help, but the tide is going out quickly and the whale is just too big for them to save.  This authentic portrait of vulnerability is at once spare, moving, and honest, tender and heartrending. For readers ages 5-9.

Honor Winners:

Crane Boy, written by Diana Cohn and  illustrated by Youme  (Cinco Puntos Press)

The Seeds of Friendship,  written and illustrated by Michael Foreman (Candlewick Press)

final-cover-crane-boy-8-20-15 seeds-of-friendship

 

2016 Winner – Children’s Fiction

The Thing About Jellyfish, written by Ali Benjamin (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers)

After her best friend dies in a drowning accident, Suzy is convinced that the true cause of the tragedy must have been a rare jellyfish sting. As she travels the globe in search of answers, she gets a closer look at nature and science, and discovers the astonishing wonders of the universe.  Suzy’s achingly heartfelt journey explores life, death…and the potential for love and hope right next door.  Jellyfish was selected as a 2015 National Book Award finalist. For readers 10-13.

Honor Winners:

Sydney & Simon Go Green!, written by Paul A. Reynolds and illustrated by Peter H. Reynolds (Charlesbridge)

The Order of the Trees, written by Katy Farber (Green Writers Press)

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2016 Winner – Young Adult Fiction

The Beast of Cretacea, written by Todd Strasser (Candlewick Press)

The Beast of Cretacea is an environmental cautionary tale about a dying Earth.  In this futuristic retelling of Moby Dick, 17 year old Ishmael travels to a pristine planet called Cretacea and risks his life on a fishing crew that hunts down ocean-dwelling beasts to harvest and send back to the resource-depleted Earth. His journey with Captain Ahab becomes a quest to capture the elusive Great Terrafin and takes him on encounters with pirates and reveals mysteries about his past.  For readers ages 12 and up.

2016 Winner – Children’s Nonfiction

Children’s Nonfiction

Mission: Sea Turtle Rescue, written by Karen Romano Young and Daniel Raven-Ellison (National Geographic Society)

Kids can connect their love of animals with their passion to help save them, discovering amazing true adventure stories, gorgeous photography, hands-on activities, fascinating information, and more. Provides in-depth information about their habitats, challenges, and successes, so that kids can take action to help save these amazing endangered creatures.  For readers ages 10 and up.

Honor Winners:

One Plastic Bag: Isatou Ceesay and the Recycling Women of the Gambia, written by Miranda Paul and illustrated by Elizabeth Zunon (Millbrook Press)

Untamed: The Wild Life of Jane Goodall, written by Anita Silvey (National Geographic Society)

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2016 Green Earth Book Award Qualifying List

We announced the shortlist for our 2016 National Green Earth Book Award, which honors authors whose books best convey the environmental stewardship message to children and young adults and inspire them to respect their natural world.

The list includes 120 nominated titles published during 2015 from which the the winners were selected.

The Nature Generation offers its sincere congratulations to these authors,” said President Amy Marasco. “It is gratifying to see the dedication, commitment, and enthusiasm they have toward bringing the beauty of nature and the message of stewardship to our next generation of stewards.”

Click here to download the 2016 Green Earth Book Award Qualifying List

Thank You to Our 2016 Judges

Special Thanks to the members of the Green Earth Book Award Judging Committee, which is of 25 volunteers representing authors, librarians, environmental professionals, and educators. ::  Darby Bade, CSRA International; Sheila Barnett, Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, Office of Environmental Education; Ernie Bond, Salisbury University, Chair of Teacher Education; Shanetia Clarke, Salisbury University, Faculty in Teacher Education; Patty Dean, Salisbury University, Associate Professor in Teacher Education; Tony Diecidue, Innovate, Director, Business Management Consulting; Josh Falk, National Environmental Education Foundation, Education Program Officer; Tricia Fisher, Broadneck Elementary School, Fourth Grade Teacher; Doris Gebel, Children’s Literature Consultant; Nick Glass, TeachingBooks.net, Founder & Executive Director; Pam Holley, Young Adult Library Services Association, Past President; Lydia Kline, National Institutes of Health, Science Policy Analyst; Ian Kline, The Cadmus Group, President and CEO; Laura Marasco, Salisbury University, Professor Emerita, Education Specialties; Cynthia McDermott, Antioch University, Director of the Education Department; Margy Meeks, Retired Librarian; Maren Ostergard, King County Library System, Early Literacy/Outreach Librarian; Robin Richardson, Federal Government; Sharon Sheridan, GFWC West Virginia President-Elect 2014-2016; Retired Librarian; Ed Sullivan, Author, Editor, and Educator; Tamara Teaff, Retired Librarian, Virginia Reader’s Choice Committee; Peter Trick, The Cadmus Group, Executive Vice President; Heather Vance-Chalcraft, East Carolina University, Professor of Biology; and Emily White, South Dakota State University, South Dakota Geographic Alliance, Alliance Coordinator.

Green Earth Book Award Winners in the News

“One of the beauties of the Earth Book Award is that it recognizes an author who’s writing about a topic that is of vital importance to our Earth, yet it’s an area that, until recently, received little attention.”

~ Pam Spencer Holley, author of the American Library Association’s Quick and Popular Reads for Teens ~

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