Inspiring Environmental Stewards

Taking Photos in Nature with your Smartphone

Early spring is a great time to capture nature as it begins to awaken. Look for the first shoots of bright spring green along riverbanks; budding leaves and flowers on trees, and snowdrops and primroses sprinkled in woods and gardens. Most of us use a smartphone camera to capture images — it’s easy to carry and produces decent quality photos. Here are a few tips to take it up a notch when taking shots of your friends, family, and nature.

Tip: Avoid direct sunlight

An overcast day is a perfect outdoor lighting situation for taking photographs. If it’s sunny, ask your subjects stand in bright shade. Try to get shots during the golden hour before and after sunrise and sunset – the sky is colorful enough for even a camera phone to capture land and sky with good exposure.

Tip: Shoot in landscape mode

Except for tall structures, images look much better in landscape orientation, especially when sharing on most social media platforms.

Tip: Clean Your Lens

The inside of your purses and pockets are not clean and lens gets dirty and smudged. Make it a routine to clean the front and back lens to avoid smudges and specks that will ruin your picture.

Tip: Use the grid lines option

rule of thirds

The built-in grid lines, which are placed in a tic-tac-toe format, break the image so you can apply the rule of thirds in your composition. Place strong lines and divisions on the grid lines and position elements of interest on the intersections.

Tip: Clean Your Lens

The inside of your purses and pockets are not clean and lens gets dirty. Make it a routine to clean the front and back lens to avoid smudges and specks that will ruin your picture.

Tip: Stabilize your camera

Hold the camera phone with both hands and brace your upper arms against your body when you shoot. This technique will give better results and sharper images.

Tip: Get Up close

shutterstock_57277057

Try getting up close to show details or an interesting point of view.

Tip: Crop, don’t zoom

Because of optical zoom shortcomings in smartphones, it is best to take a photo from your camera with no zoom and then edit the image by cropping.

Tip: Ditch the Flash

Since the smartphone flash is so close to the lens, most images taken using it will have glare and unflattering light causing yellow skin, demon eyes and blur.

Tip: Shoot different angles and heights

black vulture

Make something ordinary look more interesting – take shots above looking down or from ground level looking up, or add surprise by creating a distortion or new angle.

Eco Tips

The average person uses how many gallons of water each day?

  1. 10 gallons
  2. 50 gallons
  3. 100 gallons
  4. 500 Gallons
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